Tag Archives: complications

Game 13: Rustlavi-SmithyQ, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

I remember playing this game, and my thoughts were all over the place.  I went from super confident to super worried and back again.  Truly Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, for it’s hard to imagine the same person played all my moves.

If you go by the computer, my first nine moves are perfect.  I then start turning into Mr. Hyde, where my moves become worse and worse, until finally I make five tactically flawed moves in a row.  Fortunately, Dr. Jekyll starts to reassert himself, and I finish the game off in an endgame without incident.

The game is short but the analysis long, mostly due to the mistakes.  Dig in and get ready to calculate with me. Continue reading

Breaking Down How I Win Chess Games

First, let me celebrate.  I recently reached the 2100 rating mark … and then immediately lost a game to fall below it … then had a few draws … then I won and now I’m back over 2100!  It’s by exactly one point, but I’ll take it.

Over 2100

Just a few years ago, I had been stuck at 1800 most of my life. To have my rating now over 2000, let alone over 2100, is like a dream come true.

When I broke the 2000 barrier for the first time last year, I wrote a post examining exactly how I did it.  That is, I looked at every single victory and classified it by type.  For instance, sometimes I won by a mating attack, sometimes by an endgame advantage, and sometimes my opponents just hung material and I took it.  It was a good experience, and quite eye-opening.  I learned a lot about myself…

… and then I wondered, if this were so useful only looking at one year’s worth of games, how much more insight would I get from looking at ALL my games?  The thought never left my head, and after nearly three months of work, I present to you my findings.  It’s pretty awesome. Continue reading

Example of Winning Via Complication

Sometimes chess games get messy.  Instead of calm logic the board is set aflame in chaos, and you can’t tell heads from tails.  You have no idea what the heck is going on.  There are so many hanging pieces and potential tactics that only a computer can calculate it all.  All you can do is keep your head above the water and try to out-steer your opponent in the tactical mayhem.

In general, such games fall under two types.  First, both sides attack the enemy King.  This is especially common in opposite-side castling, like the Sicilian Dragon.  Very complicated.  Second, there can be a sacrifice for unclear compensation.  Giving up a pawn or a piece for attack is the prime example.

Here are two examples from my own games that show both examples. Continue reading