Tag Archives: game analysis

Game 13: Rustlavi-SmithyQ, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

I remember playing this game, and my thoughts were all over the place.  I went from super confident to super worried and back again.  Truly Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, for it’s hard to imagine the same person played all my moves.

If you go by the computer, my first nine moves are perfect.  I then start turning into Mr. Hyde, where my moves become worse and worse, until finally I make five tactically flawed moves in a row.  Fortunately, Dr. Jekyll starts to reassert himself, and I finish the game off in an endgame without incident.

The game is short but the analysis long, mostly due to the mistakes.  Dig in and get ready to calculate with me. Continue reading

Game 11: ChessScott22-SmithyQ: Positional Outplay

When I play my best chess, I make things look simple.  I don’t use fancy tactics, I don’t have to sacrifice the kitchen sink.  I just improve my position, slowly and gradually, and then I win.  Okay, so I’m missing a couple steps in the middle there, but that’s the general outlook.

This game shows this almost perfectly.  White makes an early inaccuracy in the Nimzo, and he basically loses a pawn by force.  From there I just slowly move forward and suddenly White is in a dire, terrible position.  After about move 10, none of my moves are difficult or hard to find, and White gets swept away.

This is positionally outplay, my favourite way to play.  Let’s take a look. Continue reading

SmithyQ-DrawmeJoe, March 2017: A Mess From Start to Finish

If you’ve seen any of my chess games before, you’ll know I tend to favour fairly calm, logical positions.  I’m much more of a Karpov than a Kasparov, if you will.  Sometimes, though, logic goes out the window.  Sometimes you just have a mess and have to deal with it the best you can.

That’s what happened here.  We had a weird opening, where I won a pawn but got into a messy position.  This then lead to a weird middlegame, where both Kings were displaced and major weaknesses were everything.  Things then settled down in the endgame, but even here there was a mess that needed cleaning up.

It took me over a week to analyze this game.  Due to its messy nature, both my opponent and I made many mistakes, and it took a long, computer-assisted look to determine best play.  Those mistakes also make the game longer and, honestly, perhaps somewhat bloated, but there’s a lot to learn.  Let’s take a look. Continue reading